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Sketches of New York
May 19, 2016

This post was written by Marybeth Kavanagh, Reference Archivist, Deptartment Of Prints, Photographs and Architectural Collections. Today there is nothing remarkable about the idea of New York as a large, diverse, cosmopolitan city. But to mid-19th century New Yorkers,  the rapid growth of New York  from a small, walkable city to a bustling, sprawling metropolis must have been a…

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AHMC of the Month: Peter, born of Lilly
May 11, 2016

This post was written by Julita Braxton, AHMC Cataloger. One collection within the American Historical Manuscript Collection (AHMC) is composed of four birth certificates for children born to enslaved mothers, following the passage of “An Act for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery” in New York in July, 1799. This is a birth certificate for a…

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H:4 in. W:5 in.; Glass negatives; Negatives (photographic)
James Reuel Smith’s New York City Springs
May 4, 2016

This post was written by Luis Rodriguez, Collections Management Specialist  By 1897, New York City was well on its way toward being the roaring metropolis of steel and concrete that we know today. Elevator cars were carrying passengers up and down in the earliest skyscrapers, while the elevated rail lines stretched further and further uptown….

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The World Journal Tribune: or the Birth and Death of the Great New York Daily Newspaper
April 26, 2016

This post was written by Mariam Touba, Reference Librarian for Printed Collections It was to hit the newsstands fifty years ago this week:  a desperate effort to save the great New York City daily newspaper.  The new paper’s hybrid name, World Journal Tribune, sounded forlorn even then. The new title represented an attempt to merge…

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Dorothy C. Barck and Professional Leadership
April 20, 2016

This post was written by Sarah Rose, archival intern from Queens College on the Institutional Archives Project. Since February, I have been working with the papers of former N-YHS Librarian Dorothy C. Barck. Barck was hired as an assistant in the library in 1922 by Librarian Alexander Wall and remained at N-YHS for 32 years….

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AHMC of the Month: Amateur Astronomer James H. Gardiner
April 13, 2016

This post was written by cataloger Catherine Falzone. The American Historical Manuscript Collection (AHMC) contains a wealth of manuscript materials by Americans both famous and obscure. For April’s “AHMC of the Month,” we turn to someone from the latter category: amateur astronomer James H. Gardiner (approximately 1845-1889) of Newburgh, N.Y. In a letter to James Wells from March…

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John F. Kennedy’s First Subscription to Time
April 6, 2016

This post was written by Luis Rodriguez, Collections Management Specialist  The Kennedy family had a long and generally positive relationship with Time and its founder Henry Luce. Joseph P. Kennedy had several meetings with Luce while the former served as the United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom, and from the late 1930s on into the post-war…

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The Declaration of Sentiments: “No more or less radical than the American Revolution”
March 31, 2016

This post was written by Maureen Maryanski, Reference Librarian for Printed Collections. As Women’s History Month draws to a close, let’s focus on one of the founding documents of American feminism: the Declaration of Sentiments. Drafted, debated, and signed during the first women’s rights convention at Seneca Falls, New York in July 1848, the Declaration…

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NOW ON VIEW: Selections from the American Historical Manuscript Collection
March 29, 2016

In the past, the only way to find materials within the vast set of collections previously known as “Miscellaneous Manuscripts” was to ask a librarian or grapple with an incomplete card catalog. Now, thanks to a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Library is creating online catalog records that will provide intellectual…

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