New-York Historical Society

Author Archives: admin

Elephants in the (Reading) Room

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What really happened to Hog Island?

Lore has it that Hog Island – a little spit of land off the coast of Far Rockaway that was said to resemble the back of a hog — was washed away in the hurricane of 1893.  But though this story is trotted out every time New York City is threatened (like now) by another [...]

Saving (at least some of) America’s Treasures

When the Hotel Pennsylvania opened in 1916, it was the world’s largest hotel, a stately complement to the grand Pennsylvania Railroad Station across Seventh Avenue. Its guests enjoyed a rooftop restaurant, Turkish baths, and Roman decorative flourishes. Now, close to a century later, it merely lingers while the building’s owners make plans to replace it [...]

Taking the Plunge: Pools of New York City

It may come as a surprise that the so-called concrete jungle of New York City has no fewer than 54 outdoor pools maintained by the Department of Parks and Recreation. Astoria Park Pool.  Geographic File, PR 020. New Yorkers have been taking the plunge in the Big Apple since the late 1800s, when the state [...]

One Temporary Friend, One Permanent Enemy

The U.S. Marshal Service has been providing protection for federal judges since 1789. In 2010, Marshals investigated about 1,400 threats and inappropriate communications to the federal judiciary, and provided protection for more than 2,000 federal judges. Although there has been a noted increase in recent years, threatening federal judges is hardly a new phenomenon. When [...]

Historic Photographs of N-YHS Now Online

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"Pitching headlong into misery"

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East Hamptons Hooch

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Of the late, tremendous tornado. Or not.

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Movers and Shakers

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About

This is a blog created by staff members in the library to draw attention to the richness and diversity of our collections.

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