New-York Historical Society

Author Archives: maurita

“Aliens” in America: British Citizens during the War of 1812

Post written by Rachel Schimke, a spring intern at N-YHS who processed the Peter Curtenius Papers.  This year marks the bicentennial of the War of 1812, a conflict that is often overshadowed by the more celebrated wars in our nation’s history. The newly processed Peter Curtenius Papers offer invaluable information for researchers interested in this […]

Ladies, Get Ready: Its a Leap Year!

Ever since the idea of an extra day every four years was implemented as a corrective measure for the calendar, it has been filled with traditions and superstitions.  One of these is the (shocking!) idea that a woman may propose to a man on February 29th (or anytime during a Leap Month or even the […]

A Castle on the Hudson: the Bannerman Island Story

Post written by Ashley Todd, a fall intern at N-YHS who processed the Bannerman Family Papers. The collection was generously donated by Virginia Betts in 2011. If you have ever taken the Metro-North Hudson Line train to Poughkeepsie then you are probably familiar with the haunting castle ruins that sit on a small island between […]

Early Vampire Celebrations

It appears that New Yorker’s love for vampires began before the rise of gothic rockers or even the publication of Bram Stoker’s book Dracula in 1897. The N-YHS library  collection includes invitations and programs for dinner parties from 1892-1893 called a “Death Watch” sponsored by an organization entitled “Order of the Vampires” or sometimes simply called […]

An Occasion for a Rare “Screaming” Headline

Written by Mariam Touba, N-YHS Reference Librarian Even as we are told that newspapers are a dying medium, each of us can remember their banner headlines announcing momentous events.  Such headlines, however, did not always come with newspapers.  How then did early newspapers alert their readers to important occurrences?  The answer is, “very subtly,” at […]

Egypt on Broadway

Many New Yorkers are likely unaware that a collection of ancient Egyptian items once resided on Broadway near Astor Place. From 1853-1860 the Abbott Collection, displayed as the Egyptian Museum, was located at the Stuyvesant Institute at 659 Broadway.  Dr. Henry Abbott was a British physician who lived in Cairo for over 20 years and […]

About

This is a blog created by staff members in the library to draw attention to the richness and diversity of our collections.

Subscribe

Support n-yhs

Help us present groundbreaking exhibitions and develop educational programs about our nation's history for more than 200,000 schoolchildren annually.