Jonathan Edwards and the Flying Spiders
September 29, 2015

This post is by cataloger Catherine Falzone. Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758), New England preacher and theologian, is perhaps most famous for the 1741 sermon, “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,” and for being a central figure in the religious revival known as the First Great Awakening. If you know him just from that sermon,…

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New York Now: The Raymond Germann Photograph Collection
September 17, 2015

The Library has recently acquired the Raymond Germann Photograph Collection, a great addition to our collection of documentary photography of contemporary New York City. With over 300 images of NYC from 1978 to 2015, the collection captures views of the ever-evolving cityscape and examines the intersection of architecture and street life. Below is a selection of Germann’s  photos that highlight the geometry of the built…

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Learning the Hard Way at the New York Parental School
September 9, 2015

If young students are feeling frustrated by the demands of the new school year, perhaps they can be grateful that they weren’t around a century ago when they might have been sent off to the New York Parental School in Flushing, Queens. The boys pictured here were deemed to be habitual truants and troublemakers and…

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“People generally are improving in their knowledge of good Tea”: 19th Century Americans & Tea
September 2, 2015

This post was written by Samantha Walsh, Reference Assistant in the Department of Prints, Photographs & Architectural Collections  On September 9, 1828, a member of the Townsend family attended a tea auction at Lippincott & Richards auction house in Philadelphia. While the purchase of tea by a New York merchant is not surprising, I was intrigued…

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Inside a Civil War Prison Camp: Sketches from Point Lookout
August 26, 2015

This post is by Alex Japha, Digital Preservation Intern in the Patricia D. Klingenstein Library. As part of our ongoing effort to re-launch the digital collection Civil War Treasures from the New-York Historical Society, formerly hosted by the Library of Congress’ American Memory website, we have made available 42 sketches from the Union prison camp at Point Lookout, Maryland….

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Civil War in 3D: Stereographs from the New-York Historical Society
Civil War in 3D: Stereographs from the New-York Historical Society
August 12, 2015

This post is by Alex Japha, Digital Preservation Intern in the Patricia D. Klingenstein Library. While 3D technology is now most associated with big-budget movies, 3D imagery is not a new concept. As part of the New-York Historical Society’s ongoing effort to make the Civil War Treasures Collection available digitally, more than 700 stereographs of the…

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Horatio Gates, Samuel Washington, and America’s Original Sin
July 28, 2015

This post was written by Julia Lipkins, Reference Archivist, Manuscripts Department. Archival collections from the Revolutionary War period are thick with stories of heroic soldiers and their battles won and lost. Although less evident, collections of this era also contain documentation of what President Obama describes as the “nation’s original sin,”[i] i.e. the institution of slavery. I…

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The Radical Prison Press: Prison Times and Culture at Fort Delaware
July 23, 2015

This post is by Jonah Estess, Digital Project Intern in the Patricia D. Klingenstein Library. In the New-York Historical Society library collection is number one, volume one of Prison Times, a newspaper devised and edited by prisoners at the Union Army prison at Fort Delaware, Delaware. The document itself is handwritten and well organized, ready for…

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Cards versus Slips: Rufus King and Collection Concordance
July 14, 2015

This post was written by Nora Slominsky, New-York Historical Society Graduate Archival Research Fellow A key figure in the politics of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, Rufus King was a powerful Federalist senator, diplomat, and attorney. In his very limited spare time, he also built and maintained one of the largest personal libraries in the Early…

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