Cards versus Slips: Rufus King and Collection Concordance
July 14, 2015

This post was written by Nora Slominsky, New-York Historical Society Graduate Archival Research Fellow A key figure in the politics of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, Rufus King was a powerful Federalist senator, diplomat, and attorney. In his very limited spare time, he also built and maintained one of the largest personal libraries in the Early…

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The Many Faces of a Primary Source: Philip L. White and the Beekman Family Papers
July 8, 2015

This post was written by John C. Winters, a New-York Historical Society Graduate Archival Research Fellow Sometimes, the sources historians use are not all we believe them to be. Whether a primary source collection is incomplete, transcribed and edited heavily or simply consists of unreadable copies of the originals, historians need to be wary about…

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Seal and Flag of the City of New York, edited by John B. Pine (1915) F128 CR114.P6
Of Seals and Rampant Beavers: New York City’s Flag on its 100th Birthday
June 23, 2015

This post was written by Mariam Touba, Reference Librarian for Printed Collections Well, not those seals, as in, mammals sunning themselves on rocks.  We talk here of a heraldic emblem or insignia.  New York City’s seal and flag celebrate their 100th birthday this week, and yes, beavers are always a big part of the story.  The…

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American emancipation or African colonization: Juneteenth, Paul Cuffe and “the society of people of colour”
June 17, 2015

This post was written by Julita Braxton, AHMC Cataloger. On June 19, 1865, two and a half years after Lincoln granted freedom to all persons enslaved within rebellious states through the issue of the Emancipation Proclamation, word finally reached Galveston, Texas. It was on this date that Union soldiers brought news that the war had…

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Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes in America
June 3, 2015

Written by Maureen Maryanski, Reference Librarian for the Printed Collections. Last week the New-York Historical Society proudly opened its new installation of Pablo Picasso’s “Le Tricorne” drop curtain, formerly located in the hallway of the Four Seasons Restaurant until its removal and conservation late last year. This impressive 20 foot square curtain was commissioned as part…

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The Beekman Family Papers and the Archival Challenges of Women’s History
May 26, 2015

This post was written by Alisa Wade, New-York Historical Society Graduate Archival Research Fellow James Beekman and his wife, Jane Keteltas Beekman, circulated in New York’s high society in the post-Revolutionary era.  After returning to the city following British evacuation in 1783, the Beekman family reintegrated themselves into the social circles of the urban elite,…

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Meaningful Utility: The Handwritten Word During the American Civil War. Part 2 of 2.
May 19, 2015

This post is by Jonah Estess, Digital Project Intern in the Patricia D. Klingenstein Library. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, approximately 60,000 amputations were performed during the Civil War. This equates to approximately three out of every four wartime operations. A large percentage of those soldiers had hand or arms amputated. For those…

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“What the business requires”: Early 20th Century Firefighting in NYC
May 12, 2015

This post was written by Marybeth Kavanagh, Reference Librarian for Prints, Photographs and Architectural Collections On July 31, 1865, Engine Company 1 of the new Metropolitan Fire Department went into service, and the transition from a volunteer to a paid professional fire department in New York City had begun. The Metropolitan Fire Dept. was originally…

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“A Terrible Mass of Wood, Iron, Steam, and Water – and Worst of all Lives and Souls!!” – Dwight C. Harris, Lusitania Survivor
May 6, 2015

This post was written by Tammy Kiter, Manuscript Reference Librarian. On the morning of May 1, 1915, the German Embassy in the United States placed ads in New York newspapers issuing serious warnings to anyone planning to travel on an Atlantic voyage; alerting them that a war zone existed in the waters adjacent to the…

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