New-York Historical Society

Category Archives: Collections

John Ruggles Strong: another “Strong” diarist

If not quite a household name, George Templeton Strong enjoys a certain notoriety among historians as a pungent observer of 19th century New York. His 2250-page diary, held by the New-York Historical Society, has been described as “the greatest of American diaries, and one of the world’s great diaries,” and has been cited or quoted [...]

Cuttin’ the mustard: Gulden’s and the American Institute

Let’s talk mustard. Even if you’ve never actually tried it, it’s unlikely you’d have trouble recognizing a bottle of Gulden’s. Its distinctive gold and crimson label is, at least as far as condiments go, iconic. But have you ever taken a closer look? Like many brands, Gulden’s slapped images of medals  earned in bygone days on [...]

From Kilted Soldiers to Scottish Poets–The New York Caledonian Club

This post was written by N-YHS intern Alison Shore Dundy. The recently acquired New York Caledonian Club Records (MS 2923) are a gateway to gemstones from the history of Scottish immigrants in New York City.  The records of the Caledonian Club document the work, activities, and membership of this society dedicated to the preservation of [...]

William Waldorf Astor’s Premature “Brush” With Death

Celebrity train wrecks are pretty standard fare for today’s news media (thank you TMZ) but that doesn’t mean history lacks its share of eccentric and ill-advised antics; among these is the the premature report of William Waldorf Astor’s death in 1892. After a middling political career and having inherited a personal fortune that drew the unrelenting [...]

“Meet Me at the Double R Coffee House”

Coffee’s big in the “city that never sleeps”. And it’s not a new thing either: a great little snapshot of this love affair has popped up in the form of a menu and an advertisement for the Double R Coffee House. Sure, you’ve never heard of it but the venture’s partners were none other than [...]

The Pastoral Records of Frederick W. Geissenhainer

 This post was written by Bob Greiner who is working on behalf of the Mid-Atlantic Germanic Society to index the Reverend Frederick W. Geissenhainer records at the New-York Historical Society . The Patricia D. Klingenstein Library at the New-York Historical Society maintains the pastoral records of the Reverend Frederick W. Geissenhainer in its manuscript collection [...]

The cure for nostalgia: nineteenth-century coroner’s reports

This post was written by N-YHS intern Audrey Belanger If you, like me, occasionally suffer from bouts of longing for life in the 19th century (Carriages! Balls! Needlepoint!), there is no better cure than perusing 19th century death records in the N-YHS manuscript collection.  Not only were sicknesses such as consumption, dropsy, smallpox, and hives [...]

Old Ironsides Earns Her Nickname: The USS Constitution versus HMS Guerriere

Post written by Mariam Touba, Reference Librarian The logbook’s entry for the morning, 200 years ago, of August 19, 1812 records hazy weather, temperature 64° in the air and a similar 65° in water. By “3/4 past 11 am” the weather is cloudy with fresh breezes, so the mizzen topsail is set. And then it [...]

Davy Crockett Almanacs

This post was written by cataloger Catherine Falzone. As my colleagues and I work to catalog the thousands of almanacs held by N-YHS, thanks to a Hidden Collections Program grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR), we have come across some unusual items that bear a closer look. Some of my favorite [...]

Transits of Venus from Times Past

On June 5th a rare transit of Venus will occur that can be seen from most of North America.  During the transit, Venus can be seen from Earth as a small black dot moving across the sun.  A transit, in which Venus passes directly between the Sun and Earth, is exceptional in that it occurs [...]

About

This is a blog created by staff members in the library to draw attention to the richness and diversity of our collections.

Subscribe

Support n-yhs

Help us present groundbreaking exhibitions and develop educational programs about our nation's history for more than 200,000 schoolchildren annually.