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The Idea of the West: Ephemera from the James G. Harbord Papers
August 24, 2016

This post was written by Karen Hammer, a CUNY graduate fellow at the New-York Historical Society who helped to process the James G. Harbord Papers. As a CUNY graduate fellow at the New-York Historical Society, I’ve been helping to process the James G. Harbord Papers. Lieutenant General James Guthrie Harbord (1866-1947) retired in 1922 from a…

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Summers on Long Island: The Thompson Homestead Memorial
August 17, 2016

This post was written by Margaret Kaczorowski, an archivist processing New-York Historical Society’s institutional archives on a project generously funded by the Leon Levy Foundation. Summer afternoon — summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language. ― Henry James Summer is in full swing, and it is…

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AHMC of the Month: John Adams and the Bill of Rights
August 10, 2016

This post was written by Catherine Falzone, Cataloger, American Historical Manuscript Collection. Even though we can’t always agree on an interpretation of the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution, we don’t hear many arguments these days that the Bill of Rights should not exist. Whatever our feelings about individual amendments, we tend to…

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Strange bedfellows: Feminist Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s surprising appearance in the papers of General James G. Harbord
August 3, 2016

This post was written by Lauren Bailey, a CUNY graduate fellow at the New-York Historical Society who helped to process the James G. Harbord Papers. Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935) has an enduring legacy of feminist political and social activism via her prolific writing and public engagement. She not only published hundreds of texts over her life,…

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Ad World Unrest: Hubert Humphrey, Doyle Dane Bernbach, and Time Inc.
July 27, 2016

This post was written by Luis Rodriguez, Collections Management Specialist. In 1964 the advertising agency Doyle Dane Bernbach created a provocative and effective ad for Lyndon B. Johnson’s presidential campaign. It juxtaposed a young girl counting the petals on a daisy with the launch and detonation of a nuclear weapon, thus attacking the more hawkish…

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Autograph book of Mary Sweeney, 1924-27. BV Sweeney, Mary. New-York Historical Society.
A Bunch of Happy Campers
July 21, 2016

This post was written by Tammy Kiter, Manuscript Reference Librarian. Along with sweltering heat and humidity, summer also brings with it a deep sense of nostalgia. Many of us hold fond memories of backyard barbecues, building sand castles at the beach and watching fireflies light up the trees at night. This time of year also…

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From the Lab: Conservation of a Pre-Revolutionary War Broadside
July 13, 2016

This post was written by Catherine Stephens, Enhanced Conservation Work Experience Assistant, Summer 2016. In Colonial America, broadsides were one of the fastest ways to spread news, rally support for a political cause, or to advertise for popular products and entertainments. These unassuming paper notices were printed in large quantities and were displayed publicly or…

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AHMC of the Month: Witness to the Murder of President Lincoln
July 5, 2016

This post was written by Matthew Murphy, Head of Cataloging and Metadata. Throughout our lives, at some point or another, we will all bear witness to a historical event. Often by accident or happenstance, we end up being part of something that echoes through the ages. Many of us keep record of our experiences, often…

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“So terrible a calamity”: Timothy Pickering, Slavery and the Declaration of Independence
July 1, 2016

Americans have spilled quite a lot of ink discussing the Declaration of Independence’s five words “all Men are created equal.” As with any historical text, their meaning in eighteenth century America is important to avoid drawing anachronistic conclusions. In particular, many would point out that many contemporaries commonly wouldn’t have regarded African Americans as commensurate with “all Men.” This underscores slavery’s denial of…

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