9.9.14_feat
“The Star-Spangled Banner” Watched O’er the Ramparts of Fort McHenry
September 9, 2014

This post was written by Mariam Touba, Reference Librarian for Printed Collections  Frank Key, as his friends knew him, had little use for this war, particularly as he viewed the War of 1812 as an aggressive one directed at Canada.   The Georgetown lawyer’s patriotism kicked in, however, with the threat of the British invading the…

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9.3.14_feat
New Amsterdam Becomes New York, and Peter Stuyvesant Gets Over It: It’s Been 350 Years
September 3, 2014

This post was written by Mariam Touba, Reference Librarian for Printed Collections It was once an occasion worth marking—when, on September 8, 1664, the English took the city.  The bicentennial of the event was toasted with an elaborate New-York Historical Society dinner at the Cooper Institute, a welcome way to set aside the strains of…

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8.26.14_feat
In honor of Labor Day: a photographic tribute to New Yorkers at work
August 26, 2014

While historians still debate who first proposed a labor day holiday, there is no question as to where the first Labor Day celebration took place. Like most other important events, it happened right here in New York City. On September 5, 1882, a parade organized by the city’s Central Labor Union marched up Broadway, past…

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8.20.14_feat
“Lamenting the Disgrace of the City”: The 1814 Burning of Washington, D.C.
August 20, 2014

This post was written by Mariam Touba, Reference Librarian for Printed Collections. “Our preparation for defence by some means or other, is constantly retarded but the small force the British have on the Bay will never venture nearer than at present 23 miles,” First Lady Dolley Madison wrote to her friend in her letter of…

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8.12.14_feat
Love and Other Dishes: Harvey Rosen’s El Borracho
August 12, 2014

This blog post was written by Megan Dolan, intern in the Archives Department at N-YHS Throughout the 1920’s, prohibition-induced underground speakeasy clubs were major social destinations for dining, drinking, dancing, and listening to live music, generally jazz.  But with the end of the prohibition era, the speakeasy gave way to a new type of establishment:…

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8.6.14_feat
Damn the torpedoes! The Battle of Mobile Bay
August 6, 2014

This post was written by Alice Browne, Ebsco Project cataloger. The Battle of Mobile Bay, fought on August 5, 1864, led to Union control of one of the last significant Gulf ports remaining in Confederate hands. The New-York Historical Society holds letters and papers from several participants in the battle. It was widely anticipated, and…

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7.30.14_feat
Digitization 101
July 30, 2014

This post was written by library intern Jacob Laurenti The digitization of collections is a controversial issue at museums and libraries.  It can be both expensive and time-consuming, and some argue that the quality and detail of artwork is lost in the digitization process.  But there are also obvious benefits to scanning photographs, manuscripts and…

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7.23.14_feat
Street Trades: The Photography of Marcus Reidenberg
July 23, 2014

“The ballet of the good city sidewalk never repeats itself from place to place, and in any one place is always replete with new improvisations.” Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities. From poet Walt Whitman to activist Jane Jacobs to fashion photographer Bill Cunningham, New Yorkers have celebrated their streets as…

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7.14.14_feat
“I wish to be honorable & right in my dealings all round” — Letters from Louisa May Alcott to James Redpath
July 14, 2014

This post was written by Miranda Schwartz, cataloging technician. The New-York Historical Society Library has a collection of eighteen letters by Louisa May Alcott, best known as the author of the 1868 novel Little Women, a classic of American children’s literature. The Alcott letters are in the American Historical Manuscripts Collection, a trove of 12,000 small…

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