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From the Lab: Civil War Blood
September 28, 2016

The Story . . . While processing the records of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, New York Commandery, we came across a poignant relic of the Civil War: a note passed between the lines at the Battle of Antietam, one of the bloodiest battles in the history of the nation….

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AHMC of the Month: Pictorial Excursions
September 14, 2016

This post was written by Christine Calvo, American Historical Manuscript Collection Processing Assistant. “I came to a dead halt, — It was like translation to another planet — all the mountains, I had ever seen at such close range were barely wooded hills by comparison. I’m lost for adjectives that are at all comprehensive.” The…

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“A Supply of Pure and Wholesome Water:” Views of the Old Croton Aqueduct
June 22, 2016

This blog post was written by Marybeth Kavanagh, Reference Archivist for Prints, Photographs and Architectural Collections. “A supply of pure and wholesome water is an object so essential to the health and prosperity of a city, that it should form one of the leading features of the public improvements which characterize its growth”- F.B. Tower, civil…

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Sketches of New York
May 19, 2016

This post was written by Marybeth Kavanagh, Reference Archivist, Deptartment Of Prints, Photographs and Architectural Collections. Today there is nothing remarkable about the idea of New York as a large, diverse, cosmopolitan city. But to mid-19th century New Yorkers,  the rapid growth of New York  from a small, walkable city to a bustling, sprawling metropolis must have been a…

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The Declaration of Sentiments: “No more or less radical than the American Revolution”
March 31, 2016

This post was written by Maureen Maryanski, Reference Librarian for Printed Collections. As Women’s History Month draws to a close, let’s focus on one of the founding documents of American feminism: the Declaration of Sentiments. Drafted, debated, and signed during the first women’s rights convention at Seneca Falls, New York in July 1848, the Declaration…

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From the Lab: Ambrotypes Abound
March 16, 2016

This post was written by Sara Belasco, Enhanced Conservation Work Experience conservation assistant. For the last six months, I have been working on rehousing a collection of cased images in the Library collection. Almost all of these photographs are ambrotypes, one of the earliest photographic processes on glass plates popular in the 1850s. The collection was previously…

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N-YHS Institutional Archives Finding Aids Now On-line (Part 2)
January 21, 2016

This post was written by Project Archivist Larry Weimer. In Part 1 of this blog posted last week, I introduced N-YHS’ institutional archives project now underway thanks to a generous grant from the Leon Levy Foundation. Several finding aids are now online, and in this Part 2, I would like to give you a short…

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AHMC of the Month: Was he mad? The sensational Guiteau trial and the assassination of President Garfield
January 12, 2016

This post was written by AHMC cataloger Miranda Schwartz. A small, bright-red trial pass from the American Historical Manuscript Collection leads us to look back at a sensational 19th-century trial—that of Charles J. Guiteau, an unstable, itinerant bill collector and lawyer who assassinated President James A. Garfield just four months after his election. For years…

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“People generally are improving in their knowledge of good Tea”: 19th Century Americans & Tea
September 2, 2015

This post was written by Samantha Walsh, Reference Assistant in the Department of Prints, Photographs & Architectural Collections  On September 9, 1828, a member of the Townsend family attended a tea auction at Lippincott & Richards auction house in Philadelphia. While the purchase of tea by a New York merchant is not surprising, I was intrigued…

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