“The unadulterated Irish language”: Irish Speakers in Nineteenth Century New York
“The unadulterated Irish language”: Irish Speakers in Nineteenth Century New York
March 17, 2015

The June 13, 1857, issue of Harper’s Weekly ran this short anecdote under “Things and Otherwise”: A woman a short time since appeared at the lower police court in New York city, and, going up to the judge, addressed him, as nearly as our reporter could understand, as follows:“R-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r!” The judge at once called the interpreter of the court. “Here, F—,…

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Gobbling Up Thanksgiving in New York!
Gobbling Up Thanksgiving in New York!
November 26, 2014

This post was written by Tammy Kiter, Manuscript Reference Librarian. This time of year has become synonymous with the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.  As we revel in the excitement of watching our favorite characters float larger than life down Central Park West, let’s celebrate three of the key ingredients for a fantastic holiday in the…

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The Shantytown: Nineteenth-Century Manhattan’s “Straggling Suburbs”
The Shantytown: Nineteenth-Century Manhattan’s “Straggling Suburbs”
June 5, 2013

This posting was written by Catherine McNeur, a Bernard & Irene Schwartz Postdoctoral Fellow at the New-York Historical Society.  In the spring of 1855 Charles Loring Brace, who had recently started running the Children’s Aid Society, ventured into a neighborhood on the edge of the city called Dutch Hill. Located near East 41st Street and the…

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