Before the Declaration of Independence…
Before the Declaration of Independence…
June 27, 2013

The line between historical obscurity and fame is often a fine one. It’s not surprising then that on July 4th no one thinks about the most important document produced by Congress before the Declaration of Independence: the Declaration of the Causes and of the Necessity of Taking Up Arms. As its title implies, it was a justification for…

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“Jeff: Davis, aint this a Go?”: Hiram Rhoades Revels takes his seat in the Senate
“Jeff: Davis, aint this a Go?”: Hiram Rhoades Revels takes his seat in the Senate
February 21, 2013

On February 25, 1870 Hiram Rhoades Revels, a preacher from Mississippi was sworn into the United States Senate. That occasion marked the first time a man of African descent served in either house of congress. While his service is a landmark in American history, Revels would not seek a second term but did go on…

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American Eagle and Irish Harp: The Story of the New-York Hibernian Volunteers
American Eagle and Irish Harp: The Story of the New-York Hibernian Volunteers
March 13, 2012

A great deal of the work done on the Irish immigrant experience focuses on the refugees of Ireland’s potato blight in the late 1840s. However, the epic story of the Irish in America, and the challenges it encountered, did not begin there. One obscure chapter of this story is captured in the tale of the…

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Happy Birthday Yellowstone!
Happy Birthday Yellowstone!
March 6, 2012

Last Thursday (March 1), Yellowstone National Park marked its 140th year of existence. It’s also a perfect excuse to remind everyone that, despite our name, the New-York Historical Society’s collections document the history of the entire United States, not just of New York and its neighbors. In his 2008 television series documenting his tour of…

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Veterans Day: Remembering World War I
Veterans Day: Remembering World War I
November 11, 2011

At 5 a.m. on November 11, 1918, the United States and its allies concluded an armistice with Germany. Later that morning, at 11 a.m. French time, World War I hostilities came to an end after one concluding salvo. In America, the day became known as Armistice Day until Congress substituted “Veterans” in 1954 to expand…

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