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Summers on Long Island: The Thompson Homestead Memorial
August 17, 2016

This post was written by Margaret Kaczorowski, an archivist processing New-York Historical Society’s institutional archives on a project generously funded by the Leon Levy Foundation. Summer afternoon — summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language. ― Henry James Summer is in full swing, and it is…

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N-YHS Institutional Archives Finding Aids Now On-line (Part 2)
January 21, 2016

This post was written by Project Archivist Larry Weimer. In Part 1 of this blog posted last week, I introduced N-YHS’ institutional archives project now underway thanks to a generous grant from the Leon Levy Foundation. Several finding aids are now online, and in this Part 2, I would like to give you a short…

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N-YHS Institutional Archives Finding Aids Now On-line (Part 1)
January 6, 2016

This post was written by Project Archivist Larry Weimer. Over the course of its 211 year history, the New-York Historical Society has been steadily accumulating the records of one of New York and America’s pre-eminent cultural institutions; of an organization that ranks as the second oldest state historical society in the United States and the…

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AHMC of the Month: Frederick Douglass letters, 1851-1894
October 14, 2015

This post was written by Matthew Murphy, Head of Cataloging and Metadata One of the jewels of our American Historical Manuscript Collection (which is a “collection of collections” consisting of 12,000 small and unique manuscript collections) is the Frederick Douglass letters, which consists of ten letters sent and received by Frederick Douglass between 1851 and 1894. In…

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Horatio Gates, Samuel Washington, and America’s Original Sin
July 28, 2015

This post was written by Julia Lipkins, Reference Archivist, Manuscript Department. Archival collections from the Revolutionary War period are thick with stories of soldiers and generals, their battles won and lost. Although less evident, collections of this era also contain documentation of what President Obama recently described as the “nation’s original sin,”[i] i.e. the institution of slavery….

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Meaningful Utility: The Handwritten Word During the American Civil War. Part 2 of 2.
May 19, 2015

This post is by Jonah Estess, Digital Project Intern in the Patricia D. Klingenstein Library. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, approximately 60,000 amputations were performed during the Civil War. This equates to approximately three out of every four wartime operations. A large percentage of those soldiers had hand or arms amputated. For those…

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“However, be you Scotch or Irish”: Thomas Addis Emmet’s letter to his daughter Jane
March 14, 2013

For many significant figures, the historical spotlight is focused on their public accomplishments but being able to appreciate the aspect of their lives outside the public sphere often presents an important context for those accomplishments. An excellent example is a cache of letters by famed early nineteenth century Irish-American revolutionary and lawyer Thomas Addis Emmet…

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