AHMC of the Month: Was he mad? The sensational Guiteau trial and the assassination of President Garfield
January 12, 2016

This post was written by AHMC cataloger Miranda Schwartz. A small, bright-red trial pass from the American Historical Manuscript Collection leads us to look back at a sensational 19th-century trial—that of Charles J. Guiteau, an unstable, itinerant bill collector and lawyer who assassinated President James A. Garfield just four months after his election. For years…

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Tweed Portrait
140 Years Ago Today: Boss Tweed Escapes!
December 4, 2015

This post was written by Marybeth Kavanagh, Reference Librarian On December 4, 1875, William Magear “Boss” Tweed, notorious grand sachem of New York City’s Democratic political machine Tammany Hall, escaped from the Ludlow Street jail where he was being held on charges of stealing somewhere between $20 and $300 million from the city treasury.  While awaiting trial, Tweed was granted special privileges not…

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Daniel E. Sickles: The Rotten Apple from the Big Apple
January 31, 2012

Far be it from us to dwell on the negatives of history, but there’s no denying that New York has produced its share of heels. High on anyone’s list should be Daniel Sickles. On a Sunday morning in February of 1859, the New York born and bred Sickles shot the un-armed Philip Barton Key (the son of…

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