6.17.15_feat
American emancipation or African colonization: Juneteenth, Paul Cuffe and “the society of people of colour”
June 17, 2015

This post was written by Julita Braxton, AHMC Cataloger. On June 19, 1865, two and a half years after Lincoln granted freedom to all persons enslaved within rebellious states through the issue of the Emancipation Proclamation, word finally reached Galveston, Texas. It was on this date that Union soldiers brought news that the war had…

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12.23.14_feat
“The Peace of Christmas Eve”: Ending the War of 1812
December 23, 2014

This post was written by Mariam Touba, Reference Librarian for Printed Collections It is the time of  year when people talk most of “Peace on Earth.”  A bit of peace of the worldly sort emerged 200 years ago this week when the United States and Great Britain came to terms ending the two and a…

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9.9.14_feat
“The Star-Spangled Banner” Watched O’er the Ramparts of Fort McHenry
September 9, 2014

This post was written by Mariam Touba, Reference Librarian for Printed Collections  Frank Key, as his friends knew him, had little use for this war, particularly as he viewed the War of 1812 as an aggressive one directed at Canada.   The Georgetown lawyer’s patriotism kicked in, however, with the threat of the British invading the…

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8.20.14_feat
“Lamenting the Disgrace of the City”: The 1814 Burning of Washington, D.C.
August 20, 2014

This post was written by Mariam Touba, Reference Librarian for Printed Collections. “Our preparation for defence by some means or other, is constantly retarded but the small force the British have on the Bay will never venture nearer than at present 23 miles,” First Lady Dolley Madison wrote to her friend in her letter of…

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9.4.13_feat
“We Have Met the Enemy,” or, in Other Words…
September 4, 2013

This post was written by Mariam Touba, Reference Librarian for Printed Collections As we continue to mark the bicentennial of the War of 1812, we pause this week to commemorate the September 1813 Battle of Lake Erie.  Unlike those heroic naval encounters on the high seas, this victory for the young United States was fought…

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5.29.13_feat
“Don’t Give Up the Ship”
May 29, 2013

Written by Mariam Touba, Reference Librarian for Printed Collections Such a challenge seems unheard of in modern warfare, but, nearly a year into the War of 1812, Captain Philip Bowes Vere Broke of the British frigate Shannon wrote to Captain James Lawrence of the United States frigate Chesapeake promising that their ships could duel outside…

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12.26.12_feat
The Constitution, the Java, Patrick O’Brian, and …Audubon’s Birds
December 26, 2012

This post was written by Mariam Touba, Reference Librarian. We last met “Old Ironsides” on this blog when she won her War of 1812 victory in August 1812 against the HMS Guerrière off of Massachusetts.  Less than six months later, the USS Constitution had been refitted in Boston, assigned a new captain, and in late…

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8.15.12_feat
Old Ironsides Earns Her Nickname: The USS Constitution versus HMS Guerriere
August 15, 2012

Post written by Mariam Touba, Reference Librarian The logbook’s entry for the morning, 200 years ago, of August 19, 1812 records hazy weather, temperature 64° in the air and a similar 65° in water. By “3/4 past 11 am” the weather is cloudy with fresh breezes, so the mizzen topsail is set. And then it…

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5.30.12_feat
Who put the “Williams” in Williamsburgh?
May 30, 2012

Today uttering Williamsburg  is more likely to precede a snarky comment about hipsters than it is to spur thoughts of its namesake. After all, time has heaped layers of meaning onto New York’s place names, and while places like Fort Greene and Fort Tryon require little effort to discover that they were once military installations, other…

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